Dr. Ganz Ferrance ● Speaker ● Author ● Coach — click here for my PODCAST on STRESS

AskDrGanz Podcast - Episode 2

The Me Factor

L.I.S.T.E.N. — This episode talks about the book 'THE ME FACTOR' written by Dr. Ganz... with the focus on the stresses faced by Men.

Insights into the different types of stress that affect most everyone in relationships, whether at work, home or play... and my book "The Me Factor© - Systematic Guide to Getting What the HELL You Want".

Listen, Like and Share on @Youtube - @ApplePodcasts - @PodcastsGoogle - @iTunes - @Spotify - @TuneIn - @GooglePlay - @Facebook - @Twitter - Podcast hosted by Mighty Mouth Communications.

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Do you have a question for me? Or suggested topics for future podcast episodes?

Post them in the Comments section below. Unfortunately it's not possible to give everyone a personalized response. The answer to your question may show up in the Comments section below, or a future Podcast, Blog, Newsletter, Facebook Live, Masterclass, #AskDrGanz Chat Forum or Social (moderated by my team)... or maybe as a new Product or Service—so be sure to check back regularly. — Dr. Ganz Ferrance

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4 comments

  • Wow, that’s exciting to hear! I have to personally manage sleep to avoid decreased cognition in order to maintain my study regimen for classes and student papers. Any deficit or disruption in the sleep area = a lag in productivity, which leads to everything else getting all out of whack.

    It’s best to be proactive as much as possible, which I consider an act of self-love for my present and future success.

    Much appreciated!

    PsychSocSis
  • Hi Lori,

    That’s a great question/insight. This is exactly the kind of creative, out-of-the-box thinking that moves research (in all fields) forward. I think that, for sure, lack of sleep makes everything worse (depression, anxiety, stress, etc.). It would be great as a research project to get some direct data about depression and sleep. If you think about the physiological effect of loss of sleep it would at least set you up for depression and other issues, if not cause it. Lack of sleep is definitely a factor in burn-out (which is a close cousin of depression). We could be looking at depression all wrong – especially when you consider the lack of value/priority we give to sleep in general in western culture. Arianna Huffington wrote a great book “The Sleep Revolution” on this and I talk about sleep extensively in my book The Me Factor. Sleep is the foundation of health and success! Thanks for your questions and comments Lori.

    Dr. Ganz
  • This was an amazing episode Dr. Ganz. Thank you so much for covering what so many of us are struggling with.

    Sheri
  • Hello again, Dr. Ganz. This question is a spin-off of the first one r/t behavioral extinction and stress. The question is whether a feasible correlation exists between cumulative lost hours of sleep and depression. I know that an assumption, so often presented as fact, can stave off inquiry that may give birth to new ways of looking at this topic – depression.

    Imagine if relapses were documented as accurately as is possible via self-report at clinical check-ins. Imagine also collecting data r/t sleep hours for each day between sessions. It’s assumed that the body compensates for lost sleep with the usual drowsiness, decreased cognition, and impaired heavy machinery operation, etc.

    But what if … what if depression is the manifestation of cumulative lost hours of sleep, which then forces individuals to ‘crash’ until the body has gained enough strength to resume ‘normal’ functioning? We both know that depression is a concept/word to describe what we observe. What if we’ve been looking at depression all wrong, for too long?

    Okay. Well, that’s my question, and I’m stickin’ to it!

    Respectfully,

    PsychSocSis (Lori George)

    Lori George (PsychSocSis - Twitter)

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